Category Archives: Books

Book Buzz: The New Old Me

A woman of a certain age myself, I have often wondered, is it possible to start over at a point when you’re looking at the prime of your life through the rearview mirror? As the subtitle of Meredith Maran’s kick-ass and winsome new memoir, The New Old Me, indicates, yes you can.

Book Buzz: The New Old Me

Let’s hear it for feisty 60-somethings who pivot out of their comfort zone and find out there can be sweetness from the lemons life has thrown at you. You’ll pardon the cliches.

The New Old Me

Maran’s life had already gone through several iterations before she hit a road block that seemed insurmountable. Her loving marriage splintered and fell apart.  Her best friend died. And on a practical level, what would be her means of support now that her freelance writing gigs had shriveled into nothing?

Quite a heavy load for anyone, let alone a 60 year-old. But this 60 year-old was a life force to be reckoned with.

She applied for a regular day job as a copywriter in Los Angeles and got it, meaning a move from her memory-filled Oakland home, where she had raised two sons and lived with her now-estranged wife. Now, her roots were being uprooted. She would leave all the familiar behind.

You can imagine the culture shock in La La Land. In her new start-up, a clothing company staffed by stylish and whip-thin 20 and 30 year-olds, she felt like a dinosaur. I am the age of these women’s grandmothers, she observed. One of the shocks was the company’s Workout Wednesdays, the one day of the week when everyone came to work in their Lululemon outfits and had their fat measured in front of their colleagues. For a woman who as a home-based freelancer hadn’t worn a bra or pants without an elastic waistband in forever, this was an adjustment.

Maran is a woman who craves friendship and adventure.  She made connections through networking with acquaintances and began to build back her rolodex of friends who were up for a cup of coffee or a hike in the mountains. Bit by bit, she made a new and wonderful life.

I love this woman. She is lusty, funny, and gutsy. She redefines what it means to be an older woman whose expectations for love, friendship and meaning are not diminished by setbacks. How do we live fully, live deeply, when the ballgame of our life is in the eighth inning? That’s what you will learn from The New Old Me, a home run of a memoir.

 

One of my lucky readers will receive a copy of The New Old Me. Please leave a comment below and a winner will be randomly selected. USA addresses only, please.

I received a copy of The New Old Me from Penguin Random House for an honest review,
which is the only kind of review I write.

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Book Buzz: A Million Ordinary Days

Book Buzz: A Million Ordinary Days

On the very first page of A Million Ordinary Days, Judy Mollen Walters’ latest novel, I realized that the protagonist, Allison Wheeler, has a physical disability.

Here is the sentence:

Allison Wheeler felt the buzz in her foot the moment before her alarm sounded, waking her out of her best dreams ever.

 

Book Buzz: A Million Ordinary Days

A Million Ordinary Days

This is how I knew Allison had Multiple Sclerosis.

I have become acquainted with MS, not because I have it, but because one of my very dearest friends does. My friend Cathy was diagnosed with 30 years ago after an experience with numbness in her foot. She was walking on the sidewalk of New York City and actually stepped out of her shoe without being aware of it.

Allison has the same issue with her foot, along with other symptoms that are on the spectrum of MS. Like Cathy, some days Allison feels ok, and others, it is hard to get out of bed. Some days she feels like her body is betraying her and is frustrated over her inability to control it.

But also like Cathy, Allison is fiercely independent and refuses to let a disability disable her. She has a job she loves, two daughters she cares for, and an unwillingness to surrender to this disease that threatens to take away her quality of life.

In Allison’s familial orbit, there is her ex-husband, who is still involved and supportive, a teenage daughter applying to college, and an older daughter living many miles away. Each family member is concerned about Allison but at the same time wrapped up in his or her own life.

At work, Allison is a passionate social worker helping unwed pregnant teens. She is devoted to her clients, perhaps even more attentive to them than to her own daughters.  As her condition worsens, she struggles to cope with the limitations that are impacting her performance on the job. At first, she is in denial, refusing to acknowledge the progression of her disease. But the setbacks that used to resolve quickly are now lingering, forcing her to deal with her prognosis.

Walters paints a realistic portrait of the impact of having a chronic illness, and the ripples it causes within a family. Her characters are believable, people you swear you have met in real life.

I enjoyed reading A Million Ordinary Days. I liked seeing the evolution of each character and their relationship to one another. I also like the cover image which conveys a subtle melancholy about the content. But this is not a depressing book at all. Rather, it is a story of perseverance and hope.

For anyone with MS or any disability, it will resonate strongly.

 

I received a copy of A Million Ordinary Days for an honest review,
which is the only kind of review I write. 

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Book Buzz: The Dressmaker’s Dowry

Book Buzz: The Dressmaker's Dowry

As a first-time novelist writing historical fiction, I have a newfound appreciation for writers who excel at that genre. It is no mean feat to capture the time period authentically in every way: with dialogue, clothing, scenery, etc. I can tell you that Meredith Jaeger does that quite successfully in The Dressmaker’s Dowry, her debut novel about two women separated by 140 years.

Book Buzz: The Dressmaker's Dowry

The Dressmaker’s Dowry

Set in San Francisco and alternating in time between the present day and in the mid-1800s, The Dressmaker’s Dowry features modern day Sarah, a writer fascinated with an unsolved mystery and Hannelore, an immigrant dressmaker who disappeared from the gritty San Francisco streets.

The setting for Hannelore’s story is rich with sensory detail: the acrid stench in the gutters, the clatter of horse carriages careening down the rutted streets, the foreboding sense of danger around every corner.

Hannelore and her friend Margaret are seamstresses in an exclusive dress shop that services the wealthy matrons of the city. They both have younger siblings whom they struggle to provide for. Their home lives are dark and perilous, and they lean on each other for comfort.

One day a man from a privileged family enters the shop and strikes up a conversation with Hannelore, and her life takes an unexpected turn. But the very next morning Margaret has gone missing, sparking fear and a frenzied search. And later, Hannelore disappears as well.

Sarah’s story takes place in her beautiful Marina apartment overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge. Coming from a modest background and married into a socially prominent San Francisco family, Sara withholds a secret from her past that she feels could destroy her marriage. She is struggling to complete a novel and then discovers a headline from 1876: Missing Dressmakers Believed to Be Murdered. Instantly intrigued, she puts the novel aside and puts on her journalist’s hat, determined to tell the story of these two women from generations ago. She becomes engrossed in the mystery and temporarily puts her insecurities on hold.

In the process of her investigation, she stumbles upon a shocking fact: she and Hannelore may be linked in ways she could have never expected. What is the connection, and will Hannelore’s disappearance ever be solved?

This is a riveting story, full of suspense and drama. As a fan of historical fiction, I love all the research that went into The Dressmaker’s Dowry, especially about the lives of the immigrants who came to San Francisco in search for a better life and endured so much hardship. The photos at the end of the book are a nice touch as well, giving the reader a visual bonus to the satisfying conclusion of the story.

One of my lucky readers will receive a copy of The Dressmaker’s Dowry. Please leave a comment below and a winner will be chosen randomly. USA addresses only, please.

 

I received a copy of The Dressmaker’s Dowry from William Morrow for an honest review,
which is the only kind of review I write.

 

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Book Buzz: My Husband’s Wife

Book Buzz: My Husband's Wife

Book Buzz: My Husband's WifeIn the spirit of dark psychological thrillers like Gone Girl and The Couple Next Door comes the debut novel, My Husband’s Wife, the story of two women and one man caught up in a web of dependence and betrayal.

My Husband’s Wife

Author Jane Corry has written My Husband’s Wife from two perspectives.  One of the narrators is Lily, a young insecure lawyer, newly married to Ed. The other narrator is Carla, a lonely and manipulative nine year-old when the story opens. Lily and Ed live in the same apartment building in London as Carla and her single mother, an Italian immigrant trying to eke out a living.

Lily has doubts about her husband’s fidelity from the get go, convinced he is still seeing an ex-girlfriend. Lily herself is conflicted about her true feelings for Ed, and is emotionally drawn to a client that she is defending in a murder case.

Carla is an outcast at school and yearns for stability in her life, which her distracted other can’t provide. She ends up spending time with Lily and Ed while her mother is at work. Ed, an artist, is captivated by Carla’s Mediterranean beauty and likes to draw sketches of her while she visits. He completes a series of drawings that he calls “The Italian Girl.”

Sound creepy? It is.

A jump of 16 years in the timeline brings us to Carla as a young woman, now studying to be a lawyer herself.  Lily at midlife is at the peak of her career as a criminal attorney. She has achieved success, but ghosts from her past continue to haunt her.

Gradually, we learn about the murky backstories of both major and minor characters. The story is replete with entanglements and betrayals, lies and surprises. All that good stuff that makes a book a page turner.

Readers have responded enthusiastically to these complex, brooding thrillers — recently pegged “grip lit” — that feature flawed and unreliable female narrators. They make for a fun read, and they translate well to the big screen. I wouldn’t be surprised if we see trailers for My Husband’s Wife in the future.

By the way, the intriguing title will make total sense by the end of the book.

 

One of my lucky readers will receive a copy of My Husband’s Wife. Please leave a comment below and a winner will be randomly selected. USA addresses only, please.

 

I received a copy of My Husband’s Wife from Viking for an honest review,
which is the only kind of review I write.

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Book Buzz: Carry Me

Book Buzz: Carry Me

They say that history is bound to repeat itself. I once thought that true evil, the kind that happened in Nazi Germany, could not. The atrocities seemed so remote, so other-worldly that surely this era would live on only in the annals of history.  “Never again” has always been the refrain, a phrase that perhaps over time has lost its meaning.

Because we never imagined that things would be like they are today. 

Book Buzz: Carry Me

I’m not sure Peter Behrens knew when he was writing his devastating and gorgeous novel, Carry Me, that the story would resonate even more keenly in our changed political climate. For me, the parallels were too close to ignore.

Life hums along with its normal highs and lows. You discount the random occurrences of hate mongering. The racism, the violence against marginalized groups. It can’t get an worse, you tell yourself.

And then it does.

Carry Me

Based on a true story (which makes me love it even more), Carry Me is the love story and adventure of Karin and Billy, set in pre-World War II.  The book opens before the outset of World War I. Karin is the daughter of wealthy German-Jewish industrialist Baron von Weinbrenner, and Billy is the son of Buck Lange, employed by the baron as the captain of his yacht. Karin and Billy meet a small children at the baron’s summer house in the Isle of Wight. Billy’s parents serve as caretakers and the two families are close friends.

Behrens skillfully captures the idyllic life enjoyed by these families that is upended by the wretchedness of World War I. The families are separated. Buck is arrested under suspicion of spying for Germany and imprisoned for four years. Billy and his mother Eilin find a room nearby and struggle to survive as they wait for his release. Luckily, he does come home.

After the war, the two families are reunited in Frankfurt. The baron invites Buck to come live with and work for him again on the vast Walden estate as manager of his thoroughbred racehorses. Life settles into a calm routine. Karin attends boarding school and Billy studies locally. They see each other sporadically, just as friends, as kindred spirits.

Billy gets a good job at a firm in town and Karin is happily employed in the film industry in Berlin amidst the rumblings of anti-Semitism. But then … the sporadic skirmishes become more frequent, the harassment of Jews silently tolerated if not endorsed, neighbors’ backs are turned, doors are closed, and finally a full-blown reign of terror ensues.

Jews are stripped of their livelihoods and possessions. Karin’s job is taken away. The baron is targeted as an enemy. His house is ransacked and he is left with nothing. Jews are thrown into prison and taken to concentration camps. Those who are left are frantically trying to book passage on one of the ships departing for America or Israel.

In the mist of the tumult, Karin turns to her childhood friend Billy for comfort. They fall into a romantic relationship and he urges her to leave Germany with him before it is too late. Together they will explore the plains of Texas and New Mexico that have tantalized both of them growing up, he tells her, and then settle in Canada where they will live out their lives in peace.

I won’t tell you what happens, but the ending is an emotional, dramatic conclusion to this utterly captivating story. Kudos to Behrens for the detail and sensitivity with which his tale is spun. A remarkable achievement.

NPR has called Carry Me one of the best books of the year. I completely agree.

One of my lucky readers will receive a copy of Carry Me. Please leave a comment and a winner will be randomly selected.

 I received a copy of Carry Me from Knopf Doubleday for an honest review, which is the only kind of review I write.

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Book Buzz: Leopard at the Door

January weather has been cold and a bit frightful, so snuggling up with my dogs (and my husband) and a good book has my activity of choice. With a fire roaring the fireplace (okay, it was gas) and the dogs curled up next to me, I happily attacked the looming stack of books next to my bed, one of which was Leopard at the Door, a novel so thought-provoking and timely I can’t wait to recommend it to my book group.

Book Buzz: Leopard at the Door

Written by Jennifer McVeigh (who you might recognize as the author of The Fever Tree), Leopard at the Door takes place in a British colony in Kenya in the mid-twentieth century. Across the magnificent and sweeping landscape of East Africa festered political and social tensions as the Africans came into conflict with the British colonists infiltrating their country.

Leopard at the Door

The protagonist is Rachel Fullsmith, a young girl whose British family settled in Kenya. When her mother died in a car accident, twelve year-old Rachel was sent back  to England to be raised by her grandparents, who imposed a strict and unaffectionate lifestyle. She yearned to go back to Kenya, and following her high school graduation, she returned.

What she found was a different Kenya from the one she had known six years before, both personally and politically. A new woman, Sarah, had come into her father’s life and taken over the household, with an imperious style that was shocking to Rachel. Her mother had always treated the Africans who worked for the family with kindness and respect. Under Sarah’s dominion, there was disdain and suspicion. Rachel’s father seemed powerless to go against Sarah’s wishes to get rid of servants who had been with the family for years. Rachel did not understand what had come over her father, and how he seemed to have given his soul to this woman so unlike her late mother.

Still struggling with that loss and confused about her place in this new constellation, Rachel felt her world crashing around her, unprepared for the tough decisions about family, loyalty and justice.

McVeigh does a superb job of creating the scene. You can feel the intense heat of the African sun, the screech of the monkeys, the rustling of the underbrush as a herd of zebras emerged. There was a palpable sense of danger, not just from the possible attack of a lion, but from political uncertainty and the threat of violence and betrayal.

The last twenty pages kept my eyes glued and provided an unexpected twist.

In her many travels to this area of the world, McVeigh researched the history of the Mau Mau Rebellion, a brutal uprising that took place from 1952-1960 and resulted in the deaths of thousands of Africans. I confess not knowing about this conflict until now. It is a terrible chapter of African history that should be told so that our understanding of international human rights violations can grow.

And with her gift of story-telling, McVeigh does exactly that.

 

One of my lucky readers will receive a copy of Leopard at the Door. Please leave a comment below and a winner will be randomly selected. USA addresses only, please.

I received a copy of Leopard at the Door from Putnam for an honest review, which is the only kind of review I write.

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Book Buzz: A Dog’s Purpose

Anyone who knows me knows I love books and I love dogs. So it is no surprise that I love reading books about dogs.

I will tell you why A Dog’s Purpose is one of my favorites, one of the most charming dog books ever written. The author, W. Bruce Cameron, has an uncanny ability to get inside a dog’s head. Combine that with his sense of humor and talent for storytelling, and you can understand why his books are so pupular popular. A Dog’s Purpose was on the New York Times bestseller list for a solid year, and deservedly so.

I am so beyond excited that A Dog’s Purpose is coming out as a movie next month. More about that in a minute. Let me tell you first about the book.

A Dog’s Purpose

Book Buzz: A Dog's PurposeMeet Bailey the dog, the narrator of his story, who yearns to figure out his purpose in life, and finds himself reincarnated over and over to continue that quest. With each life he is a little wiser, remembering life lessons from his past that continue to guide him.  Author Cameron is so attuned to the gestalt of dogs, he has truly provided a window into their souls giving us readers a deeper understanding of what makes them tick. Why they love us unconditionally. Why they like sniffing nasty smells. Why they are clueless about cats.

Here, for example, Ethan the boy is teaching Bailey to rescue him in the water. Bailey recounts:

I looked down at the frothy water where the boy had gone in, then back at Grandpa.

“Go on!” Grandpa told me.

I suddenly understood and looked at him in disbelief. Did I have to do everything in this family? With one more bark I dove off the end of the dock, swimming down toward the bottom, where I could sense Ethan lying motionless. I gripped his collar in my jaws and headed for air.

“See! He saved me!” the boy called when we both surfaced.

“Good boy, Bailey!” Grandpa and the boy shouted together. Their praise pleased me so much  I took off after the ducks, who quacked stupidly as they swam away. I got so close to being able to nip off a few tail feathers that a couple of them flapped their wings and briefly took flight, which meant I won, in my opinion.

With the perfect balance of joy and pathos woven through a page turning adventure, the book will touch your heart, make you laugh and cry, and sigh with contentment at the end.

Bailey’s story will leave you hungering for more, and thankfully Cameron heard our cry and wrote a sequel, A Dog’s Journey, another terrific story.
Book Buzz: A Dog's Purpose

I loved this book too, in which Bailey is now Buddy, who rescues a little girl and realizes his purpose is to protect her forever. Over the course of her life, that is exactly what he does, but I won’t tell you any more because I don’t want this to be a spoiler.

I would have gone into a deep depression after finishing this book, bereft without a Cameron dog book to look forward to, but then I heard about the movie and I felt better.

A Dog’s Purpose, the movie

Starring Dennis Quaid, Britt Robertson and Josh Gad, A Dog’s Purpose opens in theaters January 27, 2017.

True to the novel, the narrator is Bailey, a bounding Golden Retriever who has already lived several lives and come back to fulfill the elusive purpose he knows is his destiny. Bailey’s running commentary on life as a dog is just what you would imagine a dog’s thought process to be. I guarantee you will fall in love with him.

One of the takeaways is that you can make a dog very happy just by telling him he is a good dog. So don’t forget to do that when you have the chance.

This movie trailer gives you a preview of the magic that is to come. I can’t wait.

Don’t wait until January to become a fan. Read one or both of the books first.

Thanks to the author, I am delighted to offer either A Dog’s Purpose or A Dog’s Journey to one of my readers. Please leave a comment below, and a winner will be randomly selected. USA addresses only, please.

 

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Book Buzz: Born a Crime

Book Buzz: Born a CrimeOne of our Thanksgiving traditions is to go around the table and share our blessings. For me it is always a variation of being grateful for family, friends, our pets, our health, etc. This year, though, my expression of gratitude will be tinged with anxiety about a future that is hard to fathom, at least for the next four years.

Since the election I have tried to stay away from TV and radio news. I just can’t listen to it.

This erstwhile news junkie has gone cold turkey.

That works out well except when I’m in the car. I need a distraction when I’m driving. Music is great, but there are times when I need an alternative. As luck would have it, I have discovered Audible, and the timing could not be better.

Audible is a division of Amazon, and purchases are easy either on the website or the app, which I downloaded on my iPhone. Browsing through the selections, I discovered a ton of audiobooks that piqued my interest.

Born a Crime

I was totally caught up in one of Audible’s new releases, Trevor Noah’s Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood. You may know Noah as the successor to Jon Stewart as host of The Daily Show. In this memoir he reveals a background light years away from the celebrity life he enjoys now. Noah grew up biracial in South Africa’s apartheid.

Noah, the son of a devoutly religious Xhosa mother and a white Swiss-German father, was “born a crime” since it was against the law during apartheid for whites and blacks to be together, let alone have a child. The fine could have been imprisonment for either parent up to five years. Nonetheless, Noah’s mother would take that risk because she wanted a child so badly.

Noah says, “… my mother started her little project, me, at a time when she could not have known that apartheid would end. There was no reason to think it would end; it had seen generations come and go. I was nearly six when Mandela was released, ten before democracy finally came, yet she was preparing me to live a life of freedom long before we knew freedom would exist.”

Noah’s upbringing took place in the last years of apartheid, in the 80s and 90s, in a world of poverty and intense racism. His remarkable mother was determined her son would rise above it. Strong-willed and no nonsense, Noah’s mother taught him the values of education and freedom as she struggled with the restrictions in her own life.

With humor, Noah describes his mother as a woman deeply tied to her religion. She dragged her son to church four days a week and three different church services on Sundays, in three different towns.

In these essays, Noah shares personal stories and also the broader landscape of apartheid society: segregated housing, limited employment opportunities except for menial work, and curfews not imposed on the white population.

I was drawn in by Noah’s mellifluous voice as he swept me into his world. Learning about a life so different from mine, filled with obstacles that I have been fortunate never to face, was a lesson worth learning.

And another reason to be thankful this Thanksgiving.

If you would like to hear Born a Crime or any other selection on Audible, you’re in luck. Use this code for a 30-day free trial.

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Audible. The opinions and text are all mine.

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Book Buzz: Dogs and Their People

Why write about dogs, with all the turmoil in our country right now, and with little else on my mind but the election and its aftermath?

Book Buzz: Dogs and Their People

It’s been a tough week, a gloomy week, for me. I feel dispirited and unmotivated. I needed a pick-me-up. The book gods must have looked kindly on me, because this book could not have come at a better time.

Books and dogs are two of my greatest passions. Combine them and you’ve got a win-win.

Dogs and Their People

If you are a dog person — and I venture to say even if you are not — you will get a kick out of Dogs and Their People: Photos and Stories of Life with a Four-Legged Love.

Why? Because we humans are capable of going overboard for our fur babies and the stories in this book tell you just how far we can go.

Our furry friends have a knack for righting our worlds no matter what is going on. A soulful gaze, a wag of the tail, a sympathetic snuggle — they sense how we feel, and know how to make us feel better with their unconditional love.

So how do we respond to them? With love, care, and sometimes … well, we dress them up. We sing to them. We sleep with them.

Our two pups, Max and Wyatt, are just over a year old. While it often seems like we’ve got two unruly toddlers in the house, life would not be as full without them. Here they are in one of their quiet moments.

Book Buzz: Dogs and Their People

Filled with beautiful photographs, Dogs and Their People is a book that you can spend as much or as little time with as you choose, and come back to again and again. The stories about our love for our dogs, the lengths we will go to for them, certainly resonated with me.

For example …

Do you celebrate your dog’s birthday with a canine birthday cake?

Do you know the dog people in the neighborhood as “Ginger’s mommy” or “Dylan’s dad?”

Do you tell your dog you will be back soon when you are leaving the house? As if he understands that?

Do you arrange playdates so that your dog will have a social life?

I will neither confirm nor deny that I am guilty of any of the above.

Dogs and Their People will brighten your day. Here is an example.

Book Buzz: Dogs and Their People

You will read funny stories, touching stories, like the owner who sold her house to pay for the dog’s back surgery or another who went homeless for the sake of keeping a furry family together.

Book Buzz: Dogs and Their People

I can’t think of a better gift for dog lovers than Dogs and Their People.

Book Buzz: Dogs and Their People

In this time of uncertainty, there is at least this universal truth: dogs really are a person’s best friend.

Book Buzz: Dogs and Their People

That is reassuring to me.

One of my lucky readers will receive a copy of Dogs and Their People. Please leave a comment below and a winner will be randomly selected. USA addresses only, please.

I received a copy of Dog and Their People from Putnam for an honest review, which is the only  kind of review I write.

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Book Buzz: You Will Not Have My Hate

It was an ordinary Friday evening in Paris, a typical Friday night when the cafes are still busy and the streets are crammed with people on their way to somewhere or nowhere at all, and the air is sprinkled with carefree laughter and theatres are filled with audiences out to enjoy a night of music.

On any Friday night, on every Friday night, this is Paris. But on Friday, November 13, 2015 the lively scene turned into a scene from hell.

You will not have my hate.

The beautiful streets of Paris were bloodied, strewn with carnage and death as terrorists stormed the city. Killing indiscriminately and brutally as they took to the streets, they positioned themselves at heavily populated sites to do the most damage. And at the Bataclan Theatre, where ordinary people were enjoying a concert by the American band, Eagles of Death Metal, the unthinkable happened.

Antoine Leiris, a French journalist, was at home with his 17 month-old son, Melvil, while his wife Hélène was attending the concert. Planning on waiting up for her, Leiris passed the time by reading a book. Then he got a text from a friend asking if he was all right. He turned on the television, and five words scrolling at the bottom of the screen changed his life forever: “Terrorist attack at the Bataclan.”

You will not have my hate.

In just a few hours he would learn that his beautiful wife Hélène lost her life at the Bataclan. Just like that. Gone.

You will not have my hate.

 

Book Buzz: You Will Not Have My Hate

Grief-stricken, he went on social media a few days later and wrote an open letter to the terrorists who killed his wife. “You will not have my hate,” he wrote.  “On Friday night you stole the life of an exceptional person, the love of my life, the mother of my son, but you will not have my hate.

“For as long as he lives, this little boy will insult you with his happiness and freedom.”

Leiris’ words were seen by millions and shared. His resilience and strength were an inspiration to those of us throughout the world struggling to makes sense out of the most senseless of tragedies.

You will not have my hate.

I will always remember waking up Saturday morning to this terrible news and being stunned into silence. How could this happen? I couldn’t even articulate my feelings, but that Monday I wrote Mourning for Paris to pay tribute to the victims and their families and friends.

You Will Not Have My Hate is a slim volume, just 129 pages. It is honest and raw, and so compelling that you will finish it in one sitting. Leiris begins by recalling the first few days, the shock and disbelief, his overriding concern for his son, his resolute adherence to the normalcy of play, naps, meals, story time. In the midst of visiting the morgue, going through the motions of Hélène’s funeral, and dealing with his  own loss, he was first and foremost his son’s Papa.

Leiris’ story of courage and grace, of finding the will to go on after the most excruciating loss, tells us that while there is no way to understand why evil exists, it is our obligation to honor the memory of the dead — and defy those who would destroy us — by continuing to live.

 

One of my lucky readers will receive a copy of You Will Not Have My Hate. Please leave a comment and a winner will be randomly chosen.

 

I received a copy of You Will Not Have My Hate from Penguin for an honest review, which is the only kind of review I write.

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